NEW YORK OCULAR PROSTHETICS

Specializing in high quality artificial eyes

 
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UNDERSTANDING EYE LOSS

We are here to help you on your road to recovery

Eye loss can occur as a result of injury or disease, or it can be due to a genetic malformation.  At any age this loss can be devastating to both the individual and their family.  We are here to help you on your road to recovery.

If you have undergone an evisceration as a result of (ABC) or an enucleation as a result of (ABC) you are most likely a good candidate for a scleral shell or a ocular prosthetic.

The ocular prosthetic can last as long as ten to fifteen years but is typically replaced every five years.  Changes to the socket often occur making adjustments necessary.  These changes can often be subtle and occur over time which is why it is important to see the ocularist at least once a year.

 
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ABOUT THE PROSTHETIC EYE

The prosthetic is custom shaped to the socket and potentially adjusted to enhance symmetry of the facial structures.  The prosthetic is made of an acrylic plastic.  It is created by making a series of positive and negative molds of the space within you socket. The prosthetic is then hand painted to match your remaining eye.  It is carefully polished before being dispensed.

The ocular prosthetic can last as long as ten to fifteen years but is typically replaced every five years.  Changes to the socket often occur making adjustments necessary.  These changes can often be subtle and occur over time which is why it is important to see the ocularist at least once a year.

 
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CARE OF THE PROSTHETIC EYE

The prosthetic eye should remain in the socket unless instructed  otherwise.  This is usually the case with eyes that are living and remain sensitive.  In these cases the eye is usually taken out before sleeping.

If the eye must be removed for reasons of cleaning or irritation make sure to wash the eye thoroughly before reinserting it.  It should be handles with care and professionally polished once to twice a year.

 
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LIVING WITH MONOCULAR VISION

Taking an active role in your recovery can be healing

The loss of an eye or sight in an eye is a traumatic experience.  Grief, anger, frustration are all normal reactions.  Taking an active role in your recovery can be healing.
Participation with an ocularist in the formation of a prosthetic and understanding the changes to your vision can help you cope.  After the loss of an eye your visual system including your brain and motor functions are in disorder and need to be reprogrammed in order to adjust to the changes of monocular vision.  The most obvious change being a narrowing of your horizontal field of vision.  In actuality the vision loss of the horizontal field of a one-eyed individual is at most twenty percent.  More significant changes occur regarding depth perception.
Depth perception consists of three operations:  Retinal Disparity, Convergence, and Accommodation.
An Individual who has lost the use of one eye can no longer rely on retinal disparity and convergence to decipher depth.  The system of accommodation remains intact but as it is only effective when judging distances of about six feet, it is the least useful of the three.

 
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We are here for you

CHILDREN

Having a child with medical needs can be very emotional.  Whether your child was born with anophthalmia, microphthalmia, or has suffered an eye loss as a result of retinoblastoma or accidental injury, we are here to help you get through this difficult time.

Early action is essential to obtaining the best results for your child, especially in cases where the socket needs to be expanded so as to equal the companion eye.  A child will need to be seen more frequently as they are still growing and changes to their anatomy occur more rapidly.  Handling children; aiding in their health and development can be a rewarding experience.

 
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ROBIN FINK

Head Ocularist, Owner

Robin Fink is a Board Certified Ocularist and the owner of New York Ocular Prosthetics. 
She received her B.A. from the University of Rochester in 2004, focusing on human biology, psychology, art, and the history of medicine. Prior to working in the field of Ocularistry, Robin worked in medical research labs and in manufacturing of fine china.
Combing her scientific and artistic talents, Robin is able to create the most realistic looking eye that supports the socket and, whenever possible, moves naturally.
During her years working as an Ocularist in Manhattan, Robin participated with the Global Relief Fun in making eyes for children maimed by roadside bombs.
Robin works with patients ranging in age, race, and reason for eye/sight loss. She always strives to achieve the satisfaction and well being of every patient.

 
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CONSULTATION

We will meet you for a consultation and discuss your needs.

PATIENT FIRST

We are passionate about helping others and strongly believe in putting the needs of the patient first.

ROUTINE REVIEW & POLISH

Regular maintenance promotes a healthy socket.

 

OPENING HOURS

By Appointment Only
(212) 269-6600

Mon - Thu: 10am - 6pm

Sat - Sun: Closed

47 E 77th St Suite 203, New York, NY 10075

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CONTACT US

47 E 77th St Suite 203,
New York, NY 10075

(212) 269-6600

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